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DENTAL BLOG

News, announcements and dental care articles


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Whether it be through old age or simply not taking care of your oral health properly, losing teeth is perhaps more common than you might think.Whilst incidences of adult tooth loss have significantly decreased since the 1970’s due to better healthcare, tooth loss does still occur. But, if you’ve experienced tooth loss and haven’t yet done anything to replace them, it’s essential you’re aware of the potential damage you could be causing.Eating without dentures or implants can be dangerous to not just your mouth, but your body too. Many underestimate the importance of teeth (especially if they’ve just lost one or two), and simply continue eating without them.Whilst this is extremely tempting and, over time, easy to develop a skill for, it’s important to consider the irreversible damage you could be causing. 

Pressure on Gums & Jaw

When chewing food in an area of your mouth without teeth, you’re inadvertently placing an unnatural amount of pressure on your gums and jaw.Food must be chewed properly to be safely swallowed. And, when teeth are missing, the gums and jaw have to work extra hard to ensure this happens.In time, the surrounding teeth and gums will become very sore and irritated, significantly increasing your risk of developing infection. Your jawbone will also suffer due to this pressure change, becoming more prone to fractures and permanent joint disorders.Even softer foods will become more difficult to chew if you continue with this habit, creating a vicious cycle that’s simply not going to resolve unless you replace your missing teeth. 

Bone Loss

Whilst only likely to happen if you consistently eat without implants or dentures for a long period of time, the risk of bone loss is definitely something you should take note of.Using your gums to chew can wear away the corresponding bone ridges of the jawline. Each time you chew, bite or clench on food, the ridge will experience pressure it’s simply not used to. This will cause the bone to eventually recede, resulting in permanent bone loss.And, to add insult to injury, if bone loss becomes too severe, receiving implants may be unsuccessful as the bone needs to be stable enough to accommodate them. 

Gastrointestinal Issues

The risks of eating without teeth stretch further than just the mouth.Failing to properly chew food to the same degree a full mouth of teeth would can lead to significant gastrointestinal problems once the food reaches the digestive system. If food pieces are simply too big to be broken down properly, this causes ‘incomplete digestion’.The full nutritional value won’t be absorbed by your body and, once the incompletely-digested food reaches the colon, a much greater volume of bacteria is likely to develop. 

The solution?

Replace your missing teeth!Whilst the above risks are unlikely to occur if you spend a mere couple of weeks eating whilst missing a couple of teeth, they’re almost guaranteed to arise if you leave replacing them for too long.Here at Aesthetika Dental Studio, we offer extremely durable dental implants specifically designed to look and feel like natural teeth – giving you the freedom to eat whatever you want without any risks!Get in touch today to discuss treatment options with one of our oral health experts. Aesthetika Dental Studio. 

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Bananas are healthy. Strawberries are healthy. Mangos are healthy. There’s a theme here… Fruit is healthy. So why when putting a couple of these fruits together in a blender, are we suddenly faced with health warnings from the likes of the Oral Health Foundation, who claim fruit juices and smoothies could be leading to irreversible damage to the nation’s teeth?The concern lies within moderation. And like most things, too much of a ‘good thing’ doesn’t necessarily make for the best, or healthiest decision. Take nutrition and exercise as an example.If someone wants to lose weight, you may expect that person to join a gym and train 4/5 times a week. You may also expect them to diet. Typically when we think diet, we think salads. Now if that person goes to the extreme, and eats nothing but salad for a week, that person will begin to feel tired and lack energy. A diet of just salads gives deficiencies within protein and carbohydrate intake – both of which supply the body with the vital energy needed to exercise.That person then begins to feel weak and will naturally crave sugars to boost energy levels. To satisfy these cravings that person will more than likely end up binge eating on readily available ‘snack food’ to satisfy the cravings. So to use salads as a metaphor, ‘too much salad’ can actually have an adverse affect on someone losing weight.Back to the fruit. Fruits contain a variety of nutrients, antioxidants and high levels of natural sugars. The good news… These natural sugars give our bodies energy. The bad news… sugar is bad for our teeth. So what can we do? We need to find a balance.Every time we eat or drink something acidic, the enamel of our teeth softens and some of the tooth’s mineral content will be lost. And with some fruit juices and smoothies containing up to four times the recommended daily amount of sugar, you can see where the issue lie.Many of us might opt for a banana or apple to accompany our breakfast, and some mango or kiwi fruit for lunch. Add on top of this a mid-morning smoothie and all of a sudden our daily sugar intake has sky rocketed. Just like the salad scenario, too much fruit is a having an adverse affect on our health.So what is our recommendation? In a word – water. 2 litres of water a day to be precise (not in one sitting!). Doing so is not only a healthy option for teeth and gums, but drinking water at regular intervals throughout the day boosts metabolism, hydrates skin and improves digestion.So to conclude. Should you stop eating fruit altogether? No, certainly not – but moderation is key. Should you stop drinking smoothies and fruit juice? Yes. Replacing with water and the benefits are endless…Don’t forget to ‘Like’ our Facebook page for more information and tips on how you should be caring for you and your family’s oral health.Whether an existing patient of ours, or whether you have not had a chance to visit Aesthetika Dental Studio yet, please do get in contact here if you’d like to arrange a dental check-up where we can discuss any concerns you may have over your dental regime.Aesthetika Dental Studio.

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It’s one of those things. We’ve all been guilty of it at least once. And at the time, the embarrassment… well let’s just say we avoid confined spaces with others until we’re back at home with a toothbrush in hand, at all costs!And it’s not necessarily caused through lack of cleaning, or a poor oral hygiene routine. Instead, more often than not, bad breath is caused by that extra cup of coffee we had at breakfast, that tuna sandwich we had at lunch (and they said tuna was good for us!), or that extra garlicky curry we ate for dinner.Saying that, regardless of what causes bad breath the outcome is the same. Embarrassment and dread. So if the dreaded bad breathe does catch us out, what can we do to stop us from running to the nearest exit and avoiding human contact at all cost?Well we’ve put together five handy tips that should help you avoid getting in that situation in the first place!1. First the basics – 2:2Because we can’t say this enough. It’s vital not just for the smell of your breath, but for your oral hygiene itself, that you brush your teeth at least twice a day and floss at least once daily. Finally rinse with mouthwash to get rid of pieces of food that get stuck between your teeth and gums.If this excess food is left then you can expect excessive build-up of plague. And it turn (you guessed it), this build-up of plague will inevitably cause bad breath.2. Don’t forget your tongueThe tongue has the heaviest bacterial amount of any part of your mouth. Nevertheless many people don’t take the time to clean their tongue. There’s no surprise that overtime, if not cleaned properly, this bacteria can build-up to cause severe cases of bad breath.Bonus tip – If possible try to use a separate toothbrush or a tongue scraper to lightly brush and clean your tongue. This avoids spreading any bacteria from your tongue to your teeth and gums.3. Choose tea over coffeeBy no means are we saying ditch the coffee completely. After all, morning coffee is a ritual in our house! We’re simply talking about moderation here. Any more than two or three cups of coffee in a row, especially without drinking water alongside, then you can expect bad breath.With bad breath and coffee it’s not so much the smell of the coffee beans, more so the drink itself creates a favourable environment for oral bacterial growth.Coffee also has a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer. Hence why it can be even worse without adequate water onboard.4. Back to the tuna!For many a good tuna sandwich is the perfect lunch option. Filling, healthy and packed with protein! However the fact of the matter is that it smells, as does all fish for that matter.  And why do they smell? Without going to scientific, the smell comes from the fish’s tissues being exposed to air after they have been caught.We don’t want you to ditch the tuna altogether but if you do go for that lunch option make sure your office draw is stocked with sugar-free gum to combat the inevitable. Or a spare tooth brush would be even better!5. An apple a day keeps the dentist awayWe already know that a build-up of bacteria in the mouth is a common cause for bad breath. And incorporating fruits and vegetables which are rich in fibre is one of the best ways to remove this bacteria from the mouth.Our recommendation would be to eat at least one apple a day. Apples also help to moisten the mouth – which will also help with the inevitable coffee overdose!And there you have it. Our five top tips on how to avoid the dreaded curse of bad breath! Try including these into your daily oral health regime and do let us know how these work for you and your family.Don’t forget to check-out and ‘Like’ our Facebook page for more information and tips on caring for you and your family’s oral health.If you have concerns about bad breath, and would like to discuss any of our dental treatment options with our oral health experts, please use our handy online booking form here.Aesthetika Dental

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Even though we’ve been brushing and flossing our teeth for years and years, many of us are surprised to learn that we’re not doing it properly.Brush at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste for at least two minutes, especially first thing in the morning and before bedtime.

Floss every day – usually at bedtime.

Limit the number of times you eat snacks each day.

Visit your dentist every six months for an oral exam and professional cleaning.






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Opening Hours

Monday | 8am-6pm
Tuesday | 8am-8pm
Wednesday | 9am-5pm
Thursday | 8am-8pm
Friday | 8am-6pm
Saturday | 9am-2pm


Address of the clinic

Aesthetika Dental Studio,
13 Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, KT1 2BZ



Email Address

info@aesthetikadentalstudio.co.uk


Phone Number

02089367734


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